Review - DVD Studio Pro 3 for Mac OS X

December 13, 2004

DVD Studio Pro 3 for Mac OS X

Written by Martin Sitter
Published by Peachpit Press
ISBN: 0321267893
678 pages
$29.99

Review By Steve Douglas

 
As DVD production has grown more widespread, as the skills needed for producing quality DVDs have grown in their technicality and as DVD Studio Pro has morphed into a more versatile but more user friendly tool, so has the need for quality reference material that will both remind and teach us of the many ins and outs of working with one of the very finest of DVD production applications.

Martin Sitter's newest Visual Quickpro Guide for DVD Studio Pro 3 for Mac OS X is just what we have come to expect from the Quickpro series of books. There is no question that this book is not intended for a select audience of either beginners or pros in the field. Rather, it is intended for anyone at any level of experience to use as a ready, sit by your side guide. It is organized in a sequential manner, easy to read and follow and full of useful tips that one may take advantage of while working on your latest DVD project. Unlike many books which discuss various topics with a long sweep of the topical broom, the QuickPro Guide provides step by step instruction on each facet of the production from the setting of chapter markers and creating subtitles to the making full use of the more than 30 transitional styles now to be found in version 3.

Each chapter is a full course of specific instruction covering literally everything there is to know about the actual hands on making of DVDs in Studio Pro 3. Chapters range from complete coverage of the Quicktime MPEG-2 Exporter, Using Compressor and the A. Pack to basic familiarization of the Studio Pro interface leading to the full gamut of creating your DVD with full menus, use of templates and the use of video and slideshows. There are, as to be expected, intensive chapters on finally finishing and outputting the project as well.

Each section of Sitter's Studio Pro 3 guide is punctuated with easy to see graphics, charts, tips and tools numbering probably a couple of thousand. (No, I admit, I didn't really count them all, but trust me; there are plenty to be found)

The writing is easy to read, clear and concise in its explanations. If you are new to the program, pick it up and with a nice bottle of Chianti by your side, start reading from cover to cover. When you begin your project keep it close, as you will love having it nearby to refer to. There is no theory here, no enclosed disc full of creative projects and tutorials. They have their wonderful uses for sure but this is THE book, the GO TO book to use as your major reference when a task is forgotten, a tool needs to be clarified and skills refreshed. Like every QuickPro guide, DVD Studio Pro 3 is the one you want to pull off the bookshelf and have sitting by your side as you work. It's sitting right here on my left. I have another DVD project to start.

 
Steve Douglas is an underwater videographer and contributor to numerous film festivals around the world. A winner of the 1999 Pacific Coast Underwater Film Competition, 2003 IVIE competition, and the 2004 Los Angeles Underwater Photographic competition, Steve has also worked on the feature film "The Deep Blue Sea", recently contributed footage to the Seaworld parks for their new Atlantis production, and is one of the principal organizers of the San Diego UnderSea Film Exhibition. Steve leads both African safari and underwater filming expeditions with upcoming filming excursions to Costa Rica, Kenya and Bali. Feel free to contact him if you are interested in joining him on any of these trips. www.worldfilmsandtravel.com

 
Review copyright Steve Douglas 2004

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